Why we do, what we do…

Neighbourhood Construction CIC is a community interest company based in Bristol, UK.
We’re a network of practitioners; homeowners, contractors, specifiers and researchers.


We believe in doing things differently, we believe in doing things better.

We believe by removing the conflicts of interest, static hierarchies and onerous considerations; only then is it possible to achieve better results. We believe in establishing better working relationships through a better working environment via a better working process.

We’re not a construction company and yet collectively we cooperate to tackle some of the most important common problems we find with our homes.

We host learning opportunities, facilitating workshops and training, advice and support. We offer an independent best practice approach, measured and quantified using a shared common language.

We’re building an open-source framework of systems, a Home Improvement methodology for the Renovation, Maintenance and Improvement sector.

#constructivism


It’s a long story…

https://www.neighbourhoodconstruction.org/about/


Short stories…

https://www.neighbourhoodconstruction.org/category/homework


Home improvement – Renovation, Maintenance and Improvement (RMI)


And here is why… despite appearances…

The RMI sector is not a single organisation, effecting change is therefore challenging. In its favour, the sector is already a self-organising system, synonymous with a Teal organisation.[1 ] A Tools is required for the whole to operate as if one organisation: a system. A way of thinking that supports quality advice and work by gathering, critiquing and disseminating information and objectives.[2] For this to be possible, the RMI sector needs to be part of the broader conversation. Such an organisation could then question objectives and observe varying methods to effect change.[3] Connecting the circle of learning to enhance both product-led research and tacit knowledge.[4]

The RMI sector must be empowered and transformed into a single organisation. A shift of culture is required to build this change, it needs to be developed by all those involved and shared, peer to peer in the workplace. The performance gap can be attributed to the lack of appreciation for the neurodiversity of all those involved in the learning, teaching and feedback process. The RMI sector does not respond well to learning by passively receiving information. However, the organisation and those within it, respond favourably to learning whilst actively involved in the process. This is a Constructivist Learning Environment and it is essential to effecting change.[5]

Never before has there been the potential to better understanding our buildings. The technology and information transfer is now available to create a more appropriate way of working. The most cost-effective approach to achieving a significant reduction in carbon emissions from the existing housing stock is empowering a change of culture within the RMI sector. Uptake cannot be forced but offered as an open source resource that empowers the users to smarter more efficient working practice, driving uptake, identifying and supporting those best placed to effect change.

[1] Frederic Laloux – Reinventing Organisations – [2] Sociotechnical system – [3] Double-loop learning – [4] Inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning – [5] Constructivist Learning Environments – [6] Activity theory – (Activity theory as a framework for designing constructivist learning Environments. H. Jonassen, David & Rohrer-Murphy, Lucia. 1999)*

bristol@neighbourhoodconstruction.org


It’s a long story…

https://www.neighbourhoodconstruction.org/about/


Short stories…

https://www.neighbourhoodconstruction.org/category/homework